Uncategorized

Part 4: How to create a PMP Study Plan? Complete Guide to PMBOK Tools and Techniques

Part 4: How to create a PMP Study Plan? Complete Guide to PMBOK Tools and Techniques

Transcript
This video series will show you how to create a study plan for the PMP exam. Today’s fourth part will discuss the various tools and techniques found in the PMBoK guide for various project management processes. How do you manage such a wide range of tools and techniques? There could be multiple techniques that can be used in different situations. I will cover this today to make it easier to understand the various tools and techniques.
Similar reading: 5 Essential Project Management Tips for Marketers
Let’s take, for instance, a look at the board below about different types of techniques. PMBoK Guide includes an Appendix X.6 that categorizes these techniques and tools into different types. We have nine data gathering techniques. This means that we can gather data through focus groups, surveys and questionnaires, interviews, focus group, surveys, and so forth. We have 27 data analysis techniques, which allow us to analyze data. You can do root-cause analysis, stakeholder analysis, and many other things. I have more examples here. Another one is data representation. Once you have analyzed the data, you need to present it in a diagram. I have Stakeholder Maps and Affinity Diagrams. These are the three types of data-related techniques. You can always access the PMBoK Guide to reach all process groups, each process, and every chapter. This will give you all the tools and techniques that you would need to do this anyway. It becomes clear that this technique belongs to this category. This means it is used for analysis, gathering, mapping, and so forth.
As you can see, there are many more techniques. This side, I have the interpersonal and team skills. This is about interaction with people. I can manage conflict, political awareness, cultural awareness, and so forth. There are a few other techniques I can offer, such as facilitation and meetings. Next comes communication skills. There are only two of them, so it’s easy- feedback skills and presentation skills. You also need decision-making skills. Two of these are voting and multi-criteria analysis. There are 60 ungrouped techniques. There are many types of inspection, audit, and communication technology. This was the first step in understanding the different types of tools and techniques.
Secondly, I’d like to draw your attention to the similarities between techniques. Even if they don’t sound identical, can they be used in similar situations or for similar purposes? Yes! Let’s see some examples. Checksheet and checklist sound very similar, don’t they? However, a check sheet is a table containing the results of a quality control testing. A checklist is used to verify steps 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 5 in a process, or procedure. It can also be used to verify that a set requirements have been met.
Another example is the focus groups I have here. These are informal and a group of people gather in a room called Subject Matter Experts to discuss something. Because of this informality, we don’t know if it will lead us to certain agreements or buy-ins. On the other side, facilitation is a combination of interpersonal and team skills. They are very formal. This means that they will be able to bring the same people to a fo